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Εxotic offerings in the archaic Rhodian sanctuaries. A critical synthesis of the Egyptian and Egyptianizing votives

Electra Apostola & Panagiotis Kousoulis
AURA vol. 2 (2019) 103–116

During the Iron Age, especially between the 8th and the 6th century BC, Egyptian and Egyptianizing artifacts were spread within the Mediterranean world through various trade and cultural networks. The largest assemblage of the Aegyptiaca in the Aegean derives from the three sanctuaries of Athena at Lindos, Camirus and Ialysus, on the island of Rhodes. The aim of this paper is to present a critical synthesis of the most representative religious artifacts, which were imported or locally made, and to trace their multiple connotations and functionality within the specific archaeological context. By analyzing the material in relation to the special cultural interaction between Egypt and the Aegean during the 26th Dynasty, we will attempt to trace modes of interaction, perception and creative reinterpretation of Egyptian symbols and ideas within the religious milieu of the archaic Dodecanese. This paper is part of the Aegyptiaca Project: Ecumene and Economy in the Horizon of Religion, an international collaborative project of the University of the Aegean (Department of Mediterranean Studies) and the University of Bonn (Institute of Egyptology), which focuses on the systematic study of the Egyptian and Egyptianizing objects in Archaic Greece.


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Citation: E. Apostola and P. Kousoulis. 2019. “Εxotic offerings in the archaic Rhodian sanctuaries. A critical synthesis of the Egyptian and Egyptianizing votives.” AURA 2:103–116. 

© 2019 AURA. This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of CC BY-NC-ND 4.0.